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Canon Sumire

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Origin
Japan
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Year
2019
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Lens Type
Spherical
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Squeeze Factor
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Anamorphic Type
FULL FRAME

Canon Sumire

flag
Origin
Japan
calendar-alt
Year
2019
camera-alt
Lens type
Spherical
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Squeeze Factor
crop-alt
Anamorphic Type

About

Canon Sumire Primes are a further evolution of their popular CN-E primes. What separates the Sumire lenses from the CN-E's is that they have PL mounts instead of EF mounts, and the lenses have a bit more character when shot wide open. At maximum aperture they deliver an image with less contrast and more aberration. Stopped down and they are like their CN-E siblings.

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Focal Length
24mm
35mm
50mm
85mm
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Max Aperture
T1.5
T1.5
T1.3
T1.3
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Min. Focus Distance
12"
12"
18"
38"
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Weight
2.65 lbs
2.43 lbs
2.43 lbs
2.87 lbs
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Front Diameter
114mm
114mm
114mm
114mm

Stats

File
TIFF
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Bokeh Chart
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Projection Tests

Focal Length
24mm
35mm
50mm
85mm
WFO Center
200
200
200
WFO Field
50
35
50
T2.8 Center
200
200
200
T2.8 Field
75
35
50
Contrast Average
Low
Low
Low
Focal Length
24mm
35mm
50mm
85mm
Notes

Significant SA throughout. CA only wide open.

Significant SA throughout. CA only wide open.

Significant SA and CA throughout. Does NOT reduce with slower speed.

N/A

Projection Room Notes
ARRI Alexa LF
16x9
No Color Grading
ProRes 422 HQ
ISO - 500
Lighting - Incandescent
ARRI Rec. 709
LF Open Gate 4.5K
No Sharpening
White Balance - 3200K

Test Settings

Ryan Avery
Tokina Cinema, ViRa Optical, Avery Optics

The Canon Sumire are what happens when you move some lens element air gaps around and add a different coating to the the popular CN-E series. They have a pleasing vintage type look with a traditional yet diffused modern green flare when used wide open.

In my experience they are indistinguishable from from CN-E series when stopped down past T2. This makes them versatile but also limiting in the same regard.

The extended coverage and compatibility with extended data particularly when combined with Canon C series cameras makes them a great choice if you are seeking a lightly touched up look on a precision Japanese lens.

Mark LaFleur
Lens Test Director, Cinematographer and Owner of Old Fast Glass

Canon Sumire primes are the next evolution of the popular Canon CN-E primes. They are well-built, relatively compact, sharp, lenses. I find their flares very nice for modern lenses. Canon swapped the CN-E's EF mounts for PL mounts and seems to have de-tuned the lenses in some way. Wide open, the Sumire primes have a bit more bloom to them, and chromatic aberration is more apparent.

Stopped down just one stop, and they are basically indistinguishable from CN-Es. There have been some comparisons made (mostly for marketing reasons) to K-35s. I think anyone can see form our lens tests, that although they share some DNA, Sumire primes look quite different than their K-35 predecessors. If you want a set of PL mount CN-Es that have a bit more flavor wide open than CN-Es, then these are a great choice.

Check out our CN-E reviews for more detail about these lenses' character.

Brent Barbano
Lens Test Exec. Producer, ShareGrid Co-Founder, Cinematographer

In recognizing its rich history of glass, Canon decided to revisit their lineage after creating modern lenses for a decade or so. Though the Sumires are modern lenses in every sense of the word and embody a lot of the same characteristics to their CN-E's and L-series lenses, they stand out when you open the iris up to a T1.5. Every lens has its pluses and minuses when shooting "wide-open." And though I think shooting wide-open, in general, is a distinct and purposeful choice due to the "lower" performance a lens may yield, Canon seems to be inviting its consumers to explore this unique style the Sumires bring when shot wide open.

They become "dreamy" with a smooth silky drop-off in focus, tons of chromatic aberration, and an overall softer image.

Matthew Duclos
COO of Duclos Lenses

The Sumire Primes from Canon were an attempt to provide a more “artistic” look for cinematographers. While they do provide a different look, I don’t know that it’s something I enjoy. The Sumire Primes did retain nearly the same resolution as the CN-E primes, but suffered… Er.. Exhibited more pronounced spherical aberration which reduced overall contrast and produces a more pleasing bokeh.

The internal mechanics and nearly all of the optical designs are identical to the original CN-E. One of the biggest differences, aside from the price, is the standard ARRI PL mount included on the Sumire Primes.

Christopher Probst, ASC
Cinematographer: Mindhunter

The revolutionary 1970s DNA in the Canon FDs and K-35s carries through Canon lenses to this day and though it has evolved and improved over the subsequent decades, I still see its fingerprints in the more modern CN-E line, which are derived from their L-Series still-lens counterparts.

And though lens manufacturers have had to abandon the use of lead and thorium in their glass types for the newer lenses, the Sumire lenses strive to acknowledge their 70s Aspherical/K-35 lineage, albeit with mixed results, by detuning the lenses in the attempt to induce some aberrations and evoke a more vintage feel.

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